More Fossil Fuels

To the Editor:
    The tar sands of Canada and the pipeline proposed to carry them to refineries in Texas are being touted as a continuing source of “cheap” energy equal to that of the oil fields of Saudi Arabia.  This unabashed proposal to prolong our use and dependence upon fossil fuels flies directly in the face of the fact that the burning of coal, oil, and natural gas and the resulting release of long-dormant CO2, water, and energy is the driving force behind climate change and severe weather patterns and events.  Despite record industry profits and the likelihood that not all this oil is destined for domestic use, this project will nonetheless receive federal (taxpayer) subsidies and, once again, the pursuit of the God Almighty Dollar will trump the well-being of the world.
RP

Environment and Energy: What is the solution?

To the Editor:
Considering that the burning of fossil hydrocarbons, with all its ramifications on the planet, will likely continue for decades to come, is The Question of the 21st Century, can technology solve the difficulties it has created?  If there is an analogy in asking, will the financial sector repair the calamity it created?  the odds on correction appear slim.  There are times I think the people I saw gathering firewood with their three-wheeled pedi-cycles along a freeway in Yucatan may be more insightful futurists than all our high tech gurus combined.  Sustainability is a word certain to be overused in the coming years in reference to food production, but, wakening to a world of limited resources, a prime concern will be,  what are appropriate, viable, and sustainable means and levels of energy production and consumption?  This should be the first focus of industry, science, and government.  The rest is just window dressing.
RP